Bad Apples by Will Dean — Linda’s Book Bag

With Will Dean’s The Last Thing to Burn one of my favourite reads of 2021 so far (my review of which you’ll find here) I simply couldn’t resist breaking my self imposed blog tour ban to participate in this one for Will’s latest book Bad Apples. My thanks to Anne Cater of Random Things Tours for […]

Bad Apples by Will Dean — Linda’s Book Bag

Fifty Words for Snow by Nancy Campbell

Linda's Book Bag

Over the last couple of weeks I’ve been suffering FOMO. All round the country are wonderful wintry scenes and here in South Lincolnshire it has remained stubbornly snow free. And then I remembered that the lovely Alison Menzies from Elliott and Thompson has sent me a surprise copy of Fifty Words for Snow by Nancy Campbell and so I’m delighted to review that book today.

Published by Elliott and Thompson, Fifty Words for Snow is available for purchase through the links here.

Fifty Words for Snow

Snow. Every language has its own words for the feather-like flakes that come from the sky. In Japanese we find Yuki-onna – a ‘snow woman’ who drifts through the frosted land. In Icelandic falls Hundslappadrifa – ‘big as a dog’s paw’. And in Maori we meet Huka-rere – ‘one of the children of rain and wind’.

From mountain tops and frozen seas to city…

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Heatstroke by Hazel Barkworth

Linda's Book Bag

Back in November I was delighted to participate in the cover reveal for Heatstroke by Hazel Barkworth, since when I have been desperate to read it. Today I’m finally sharing my review. My enormous thanks to Jo Liddiard at Headline for sending me a copy of Heatstroke in return for this honest review.

Heatstroke will be published by Headline Review on 28th May 2020 and is available for purchase here.

Heatstroke

9781472265609The summer burns with secrets…

It is too hot to sleep. To work. To be questioned time and again by the police.

At the beginning of a stifling, sultry summer, everything shifts irrevocably when Lily doesn’t come home one afternoon.

Rachel is Lily’s teacher. Her daughter Mia is Lily’s best friend. The girls are fifteen – almost women, still children.

As Rachel becomes increasingly fixated on Lily’s absence, she finds herself breaking fragile trusts and confronting impossible choices…

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Cover Reveal: Sea Babies by Tracey Scott-Townsend

Linda's Book Bag

front cover Sea Babies

Now, I’m breaking my own self-imposed rules here. I’m not supposed to be taking on any new blog posts until I’ve read and reviewed some of the huge mountain of books I have on my TBR but when lovely Kelly at LoveBooksGroup got in touch to ask if I’d like to help with the cover reveal for Tracey Scott-Townsend’s new book I had to participate.

You see, I first met Tracey Scott-Townsend at an event called Oceans of Words, at which she was speaking and you can see my write up here. Since then I’ve had the pleasure of meeting Tracey properly and she’s so lovely that I had to invite her onto Linda’s Book Bag to tell me about one of her books, Another Rebecca, in a post you can read here. I have also had the pleasure of reviewing some of Tracey’s poetry in…

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Review: My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga

The Books are Everywhere

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Goodreads | Amazon

Sixteen-year-old physics nerd Aysel is obsessed with plotting her own death. With a mother who can barely look at her without wincing, classmates who whisper behind her back, and a father whose violent crime rocked her small town, Aysel is ready to turn her potential energy into nothingness.
There’s only one problem: she’s not sure she has the courage to do it alone. But once she discovers a website with a section called Suicide Partners, Aysel’s convinced she’s found her solution: a teen boy with the username FrozenRobot (aka Roman) who’s haunted by a family tragedy is looking for a partner.
Even though Aysel and Roman have nothing in common, they slowly start to fill in each other’s broken lives. But as their suicide pact becomes more concrete, Aysel begins to question whether she really wants to go through with it. Ultimately, she must choose between wanting…

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BOOK REVIEW: The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman

Karen Creamer Author, Coach, Speaker

I loved The Rules of Magic!

I was a little cautious to be reading Alice Hoffman, because I sort of remembered finding one of her prior books being, um, kind of dark. Something above about doves, I think. I’m not sure.

I must have blocked it out.

This book, however, is a jewel. It’s a tale of two sisters and a brother, Jet, Franny, and Vincent. As they grow up, they become aware that they have magic in their bloodline, in their blood, but they also have a curse. Light and dark. This is the story of how they grow up and live their lives in the spotlight of, and in the shadow of, both.

I won’t kid you–there are some heartbreaking events in this book, but don’t we all have those in our lives?

I very much felt like I was right there in the story with…

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An Extract from Gilding the Lily by Justine John

Linda's Book Bag

Gilding the Lily cover.jpg

It gives me very great pleasure to be part of the tour for Gilding the Lily by Justine John today because if I hadn’t been a blogger I think I might not have found about this thriller and I hate missing out.

Gilding the Lily is available for purchase here.

Gilding the Lily

Gilding the Lily cover.jpg

A gripping mystery of jealousy, murder and lies.

An invitation to her estranged, wealthy father’s surprise 75th birthday party in New York sees Amelia and her husband, Jack, set off across the pond to meet a whole new world of family politics. Amelia, now a successful businesswoman, feels guilty about never liking her father’s women, so does her upmost to give his new socialite partner, Evelyn, the benefit of the doubt. Wouldn’t it be nice if they could just all get along? But there’s something very dark, determined and dangerous about her…

When Amelia’s father, Roger…

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BOOK REVIEW: Uncommon Type by Tom Hanks

I have to say, I don’t agree with the statement of the cover being unpretentious. It is absolutely a marketing triumph, as stated, but just like any other book this cover is cunningly designed to draw the eye with it’s alarming loud red, iconic typewriter image and the name of Tom Hanks all over it. It’s far from simplistic! The artwork and title are designed to appeal to all ages, those many thousands of readers and writers who are typewriter obsessed and will be magically drawn to anything linked to vintage typewriters. It also has a sixties look, which is very popular at this time with young and older readers.

So please, don’t be under any illusions this cover is in any way simplistic. It’s like any other cover, it loudly says ‘buy me!’

Despite the clever cover design, I’m still very interested to read this book of Tom Hanks short stories. If it’s as good as described here, I hope he goes on to write a lot more.

Let’s get this out of the way now, so I don’t have to mention it too much during the review of ‘Uncommon Type’. Yes, it’s Tom Hanks. The prolific, award winning, Oscar winning actor Tom Hanks. Yep, the person that voiced Woody in Toy Story, that’s him. You didn’t know he was a writer…well he is, and judging by ‘Uncommon Type’ he has a ‘BIG’ future (Ok I’ll stop dropping in the film titles now before I get carried away).

I wanted this review to focus on the man, the writer the typewriter enthusiast Tom Hanks; for him to be judged solely on his writing credentials and nothing else. I am a huge fan of Tom Hanks and it could be easy for me to float his ego with an outpouring of beautifully constructed sentences that tell you he’s the best writer ever…but I guess acting is a lot like…

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Book review | The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Storyscope

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To step on a train to me is going on an adventure, even if it is just for a day. I discovered Sweden and Scotland by train. Both amazing journeys that I would absolutely recommend. A book titled The Girl on the Train is therefore something I had to read.

The Girl on the Train is in short about Rachel who on her daily train journey observes a specific house and makes assumptions about the couple, Scott and Megan, who live in it. After an incident involving Megan, Rachel believes she has seen something worth looking into.

“The train crawls along; it judders past warehouses and water towers, bridges and sheds, past modest Victorian houses, their backs turned squarely to the track. My head leaning against the carriage window, I watch these houses roll past me like a tracking shot in a film. I see them as others do not…

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